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PST: Signals for Motion

The PST Signal and why it’s different

The only common aspect between PST and conventional magnetic field therapy remains in the transmission of a signal via an electromagnetic field; the signals themselves are developed completely differently, however.

One form of traditional magnetic field therapy is the Kraus-Lechner coil. This system coil delivers an alternating current magnetic field that generates a sinusoidal waveform. This signal does not conform to what normally takes place in the body because electric activities in all living organisms follow only direct current oriented processes.

Magnetic field therapy alternating current sinusoidal waveform

Magnetic field therapy alternating current sinusoidal waveform

Pulsed Electromagnetic Field (PEMF) uses a direct-current oriented constantly repeated signal. It is transmitted at a specific intensity and a particular frequency and it remains constant during the treatment.

PEMF rectangular direct-current-oriented impulses

PEMF rectangular direct-current-oriented impulses

PST is the logical evolution of PEMF technology. In contrast to PEMF, PST generates a pure magnetic field output signal that employs direct current with unidirectional biological frequencies. The electromagnetic field serves as a carrier or transmitter of the d.c. generated pulsed signal. The “waveform” is quasi-rectangular. PST delivers changing pulsed electromagnetic signals in an alternating fashion. The intensity of the impulses lies predominantly in the range between 10 and 20 Hertz and at 5 to 15 Gauss. PST therefore functions at a relatively low frequency and in a low energetic range of field strength. The signals are directed toward connective tissue structures. The electromagnetic field penetrates the body and the biological signals can develop their effects in the joint as a stimulation of chondrocytes.